Author Topic: EC-225  (Read 1359 times)

June 05, 2012, 01:56:45 PM
Whilst pressure testing my Guideline tensioners, I took the opportunity to shoot to todays crew change helicopter, a Euro Copters EC-225, which is a revamped version of ye olde Aerospatiale AS-332 Super Puma, the likes of which fell out of the sky last month in the North Sea.

http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/yeti-monster/work/IMG_6385-a-1000.jpg
EC-225


A slightly more tweekeried image:
http://i174.photobucket.com/albums/w117/yeti-monster/work/IMG_6385-c-01-a-1000.jpg
EC-225

June 06, 2012, 05:00:29 PM
Reply #1
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Good pics, big fella. I used to work on the Puma (33Sqn, RAF). Not much to them really, which makes them ideal for field helos and rig runners. I didn't know they lost another last month?

Chaz

There are no practical alternatives to air transportation

June 06, 2012, 10:14:25 PM
Reply #2
I didn't, until I googled the Super Puma yesterday....

http://news.sky.com/home/uk-news/article/16225493

June 07, 2012, 08:29:20 AM
Reply #3
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That bunch again. Oil PX says the main rotor gear box to me.....again. It's enough to make you weep.  :cry:  At least they got out.

There are no practical alternatives to air transportation

June 08, 2012, 01:48:38 PM
Reply #4
I'll never forget the Chinook that went down at Sumburgh Head in 1986, a lot of good friends lost there (45 killed). That was a recently modified ring gear failure. The Boeing 'engineers' had decided that their aircraft needed the modification. As the rear rotor lost lift, it continued to rotate and chopped through the fuselage, only 2 survived, the co-pilot and the guy sat in the rear facing 'suicide seat'. As we flew in on crew change, I saw the wreckage as it was being hauled up out of the sea, just a pile of shrapnel, a pal went in to help identify the bodies from tattoos, he said there weren't 90 arms or 90 legs amongst all the bits. Probably the saddest day of my career...   :(

June 13, 2012, 08:16:38 PM
Reply #5
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I hear you. Sadly it's a big part of my life, though we're doing OK at the moment. I often raise a glass or two in my more maudlin moments to those that have moved on.

There are no practical alternatives to air transportation

June 13, 2012, 09:15:23 PM
Reply #6
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I have always had two ambitions...to learn to fly a helicopter and to fly in one but the failures dont exactly inspire confidence and knowing that the big thing rotating overr your head is all thats keeping you in the sky.....well, makes you think about things a bit.
Please dont hold back.Im here to learn and to learn you have to listen to the mistakes you have made,so tell me!

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June 13, 2012, 09:33:05 PM
Reply #7
I guess its like anything else you work with all day long ( I work in IT) I for one think computer break all the time. Consider the number of flights by any aircraft in a single day compared to the number of accidents. Perspective with respect

June 15, 2012, 10:33:29 PM
Reply #8
nice pics, you are just showing off with the blue sky! never been in a helicopter and not likely to - scared of heights!

June 15, 2012, 10:45:13 PM
Reply #9
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Quote from: "Kenny"
I have always had two ambitions...to learn to fly a helicopter and to fly in one but the failures dont exactly inspire confidence and knowing that the big thing rotating overr your head is all thats keeping you in the sky.....well, makes you think about things a bit.
I always felt a bit nervous in a chopper.   Only one engine for a start.
A 'Veteran' -- whether active duty, discharged, retired, or reserve -- is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to his country for an amount of 'up to, and including his life.'

June 17, 2012, 03:13:45 AM
Reply #10
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Quote from: "Bob"
I always felt a bit nervous in a chopper.   Only one engine for a start.

Not strictly true Bob, if you'll forgive me. The Puma, for instance, has 2 engines as does the helo in the pic. The EH101 Merlin has 3, believe it or not. It's been said, however, that fixed wing aircraft work with nature and rotary aircraft beat it into submission...a fair account I'd say. :lol:

Chaz

There are no practical alternatives to air transportation

June 18, 2012, 07:39:56 AM
Reply #11
Many moons ago, whilst working on the Brent Delta platform, I watched as a Sikorsky S-61N took off from our helideck, moments after lifting off, there was a loud bang, a flash and a rattling noise as it lost one engine. The faces in the window looked terrified, with huge  wide eyes, as it headed sea-ward. The pilot remained in control and was able to fly around the platform and gain enough height to land back on the helideck. That, coupled with its boat like hull, filled me with confidence in the S-61. They flew the aircraft back to Sumburgh on the one engine, minus the POB.