Author Topic: More Britannia!  (Read 1466 times)

March 12, 2015, 10:19:29 AM
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A couple more shots of yesterdays shoot at Ocean Terminal Southampton


Britannia full by Nick.Bayes, on Flickr

The Bow


Britannia bow by Nick.Bayes, on Flickr

The Stern

Britannia stern by Nick.Bayes, on Flickr


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March 12, 2015, 10:30:47 AM
Reply #1
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I bet one of the lifeboats can hold more people than were on the first Columbus trip over the Atlantic all together :))


March 12, 2015, 10:32:45 AM
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Those last two make you realise just how big it is.
A 'Veteran' -- whether active duty, discharged, retired, or reserve -- is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to his country for an amount of 'up to, and including his life.'

March 12, 2015, 10:34:23 AM
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I bet one of the lifeboats can hold more people than were on the first Columbus trip over the Atlantic all together :))



Hope so Uwe!! It's a very big boat ship!   ???
« Last Edit: March 12, 2015, 11:53:28 AM by Nick Bayes »


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March 12, 2015, 10:51:22 AM
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Wow! that's massive! you got some good shots of it there Nick.  ;)

March 12, 2015, 11:00:09 AM
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I bet it doesn't have a very large crew.
A 'Veteran' -- whether active duty, discharged, retired, or reserve -- is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to his country for an amount of 'up to, and including his life.'

March 12, 2015, 11:06:02 AM
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I bet it doesn't have a very large crew.

Apparently 1398 Officers and crew, with a capacity of 4324 passengers!!


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March 12, 2015, 11:33:17 AM
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I think it's ugly. Looks like a floating block of flats. Unfortunately it's the trend these days. It'd be interesting to watch if the stabilisers packed up in any sort of sea. (and it's been known)

March 12, 2015, 11:35:21 AM
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Those last two make you realise just how big it is.

Yeah.. When you stand at the side of such a boat you get the feeling of the size. In a photo you need some comparison

And Nick - one of the lifeboats of the QM1 can take ~120 people. The main ship of Columbus had a crew of 40  ;)

March 12, 2015, 11:39:06 AM
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Stop annoying me you lot, it's a 'Ship' not a 'Boat'  >:( :))


In simplified terms 'A ship can carry a boat but a boat cannot carry a ship'

March 12, 2015, 11:44:10 AM
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I've always thought all ships are boats, but not all boats are ships  ;)

I think the official definition is that a ship is a boat with more than 1 deck.

March 12, 2015, 11:45:24 AM
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Forgot to add - nice set of pictures of the boat !   

March 12, 2015, 11:48:49 AM
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Stop annoying me you lot, it's a 'Ship' not a 'Boat'  >:( :))


In simplified terms 'A ship can carry a boat but a boat cannot carry a ship'

We are sorry Ahab and should really know the difference here's another full shot of the boat ship   O0  O0  O0


Britannia full 2 by Nick.Bayes, on Flickr

and from a different viewpoint:


Britannia at Ocean Terminal by Nick.Bayes, on Flickr
« Last Edit: March 12, 2015, 02:23:20 PM by Nick Bayes »


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March 12, 2015, 11:52:01 AM
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Yeah.. When you stand at the side of such a boat you get the feeling of the size. In a photo you need some comparison

And Nick - one of the lifeboats of the QM1 can take ~120 people. The main ship of Columbus had a crew of 40  ;)

Uwe I wonder how many lifeboats there are on the boat ship for the 5722 passengers & crew!  ???

Titanic was also based at Southampton  :o  :o  :o


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March 12, 2015, 11:54:05 AM
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Stop annoying me you lot, it's a 'Ship' not a 'Boat'  >:( :))

Always prepared to learn...  O:-)
And as a foreigner i am even allowed to ask: what is the difference?  :))

English: boat, ship       German: Boot, Schiff      North-German dialect: Boot (pronounced Boat), Schipp

I did not look it up but in my understanding in German we make a (very unclear) difference according to the size.
A lifeboat would be called a Boot because it is much smaller than the Schiff it belongs to even if it is bigger than some other vessels we would call 'Schiff'.
On the other hand in the film 'Das Boot' the U-boat is always called 'Boot' although it was one of the bigger U-boats of its time.

@ahab


March 12, 2015, 12:01:36 PM
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English: boat, ship       German: Boot, Schiff      North-German dialect: Boot (pronounced Boat), Schipp

@ahab


Uwe, in the army we always said if you put Geordie speaking people (i.e. Leute aus Newcastle) together with the North German Plattduetsche speakers they would converse happily together, especially after  a few beers!!   :))


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March 12, 2015, 12:15:21 PM
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Uwe, in the army we always said if you put Geordie speaking people (i.e. leute aus Newcastle) together with the North German Plattduetsche speakers they would converse happily together, especially after  a few beers!!   :))

LOL...

i like the beer part

English: beer    German (the official version): Bier    North-German dialect: Beer
English: bottle    German (the official version): Flasche    North-German dialect: Buddel




« Last Edit: March 12, 2015, 12:47:54 PM by Uwe »

March 12, 2015, 12:34:28 PM
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As to definitions even Wikipedia isn't very clear but it does say -

 A ship often has several decks, but a boat is unlikely to have more than one, if any.

The freedictionary.com says -
Ship -
1.
a. A vessel of considerable size for deep-water navigation.
b. A sailing vessel having three or more square-rigged masts.
2. An aircraft or spacecraft.

Boat -
1.
a. A relatively small, usually open craft of a size that might be carried aboard a ship.
b. An inland vessel of any size.
c. A ship or submarine.
----------

I still stick by my definition of boats and ships.

March 12, 2015, 12:56:13 PM
Reply #18
My Husband was in the Royal Navy for 25 yrs and I always called Ships Boats.  He used to get very stroppy when I did. I can still hear him saying Its a Ship Not a Boat.   Of course I did it all the more  :))  :)).  The biggest one he was on was HMS Bulwark, 18 months away in those days.  I bet that would look small against this new Brittania.    I still want to go on it though.  What about the Carribean through the winter  ;)  ;)   That's where she will be    O0  :)
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March 12, 2015, 01:12:33 PM
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My Husband was in the Royal Navy for 25 yrs and I always called Ships Boats.  He used to get very stroppy when I did. I can still hear him saying Its a Ship Not a Boat.   Of course I did it all the more  :))  :)).  The biggest one he was on was HMS Bulwark, 18 months away in those days.  I bet that would look small against this new Brittania.    I still want to go on it though.  What about the Carribean through the winter  ;)  ;)   That's where she will be    O0  :)

Know what you mean Pam! The RN types were always fussy about ships/boats, the Army didn't care what they were called as long as they took us home!!


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